All Weather News

BREAKING– Joaquin Upgraded to Category 4 – Multiple States of Emergency Declared


The Latest On Hurricane Joaquin – Click for MORE

Late last night Hurricane Joaquin was upgraded to a major hurricane, with sustained winds at 125 mph and gusting up to 155 mph, this is now classified as a Category 4 storm. Movement is slow at this time, bringing uncertainty to the forecast track once this storm kicks it into gear again. The storm is expected to intensify in the next 12 to 24 hours as it circulates over warmer water and enters an environment with decreasing vertical wind shear.

Current Track
Blog_1

Current Rainfall Projections
Blog_3

The following warnings and watches remain for the Caribbean.

A hurricane warning is in effect for…

○Central Bahamas
○Northwestern Bahamas including the Abacos… Berry islands…
○Eleuthera… Grand bahama island… And new providence
○The Acklins… Crooked island… And Mayaguana in the southeastern Bahamas

A hurricane watch is in effect for…

○Bimini
○Andros Island

A tropical storm warning is in effect for…

○Remainder of the southeastern Bahamas now including the turks and
○Caicos islands
○Andros island

As for the U.S. …

No watches or warnings have been issued at this time, with the forecast track of this storm still being so uncertain. However, the state of Virginia and New Jersey have issued States of Emergency as they anticipate a potential landfall. An already saturated East Coast from a cold front swinging through has made the coastal areas prone to future flash flooding. A hurricane landfall in this region would add insult to injury with the amounts of rain, not to mention strong winds and dangerous storm surges.

Updates State of Emergency Information: HERE

State of Emergency Declared For:
South Carolina

New Jersey

North Carolina

Virginia

The Latest from NOAA
CQPZ1qIW8AQGWXJ

The eye of major Hurricane Joaquin is passing over Samana Cays in the Bahamas, 80 miles south-southeast of San Salvador. Reports from an Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that maximum sustained winds have increased to near 125 mph – a strong Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some additional strengthening is possible during the next 24 hours, with some fluctuations in intensity possible Friday night and Saturday.

A turn toward the northwest and north is expected on Friday, and a faster motion toward the north is expected Friday night & Saturday. On the forecast track, the center of Joaquin will move near or over portions of the central Bahamas today and tonight and pass near or over portions of the northwestern Bahamas on Friday.
A Hurricane Warning continues for the Central and Northwest Bahamas (including the Abacos, Berry Islands, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama Island, and New Providence) and for the Acklins, Crooked Island, and Mayaguana in the Southeast Bahamas. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Bimini and Andros Island. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the remainder of the southeastern Bahamas now including the Turks and Caicos Island, and Andros Island.

Confidence in the details of the forecast after 72 hours is still low, since there have been some large changes in the model guidance overnight and a large spread in the model solutions remains, with potential impacts from the Carolinas through New England. It is also possible that Joaquin will remain far from the U.S. east coast. A hurricane watch for the U.S. coast would likely not occur until at least Friday morning.

It’s too early to talk about specific wind, rain, or surge impacts from Joaquin in the United States. Regardless of Joaquin’s track, strong onshore winds will create minor to moderate coastal flooding along the coasts of the mid-Atlantic and northeastern states through the weekend.

The Latest from NASA

Hurricane Joaquin continued to intensify in the Bahamas on October 1 and NASA and NOAA satellites have been providing valuable data on the storm. NASA’s GPM and Terra satellites and NOAA’s GOES-East satellite provided rainfall, cloud extent, cloud height and other data to forecasters. Joaquin became a major hurricane today, October 1, reaching Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale.

NASA/JAXA’s GPM satellite provided a 3-D side view of Tropical Storm Joaquin on Sept. 29 showing the internal precipitation structure. The image showed very high thunderstorms with frozen precipitation in the cloud tops. Those storms were dropping heavy rainfall. GPM data identified the areas of heaviest precipitation in Joaquin.

On Sept. 30 at 15:45 UTC (11:45 a.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite saw Hurricane Joaquin off the Bahamas. The visible image showed that an eye was beginning to form and that bands of thunderstorms were wrapping into the low-level center from the south.

On October 1 at 1330 UTC (9:30 a.m. EDT) NOAA’s GOES-East satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Joaquin covering the southern Bahamas and extending over southeastern Cuba, and the island of Hispaniola (which includes Haiti and the Dominican Republic). Joaquin’s eye had become completely visible now that the storm had reached Category 4 status.

oaquin was moving toward the west-southwest near 5 mph (7 kph), and this motion is expected to continue today. NHC noted that a turn toward the west- northwest is forecast tonight (Oct. 1), followed by a turn toward the north and an increase in forward speed on Friday, Oct. 2. On the forecast track, the center of Joaquin will move near or over portions of the central Bahamas today and tonight and pass near or over portions of the northwestern Bahamas on Friday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 120 mph (195 km/h) with higher gusts. Joaquin is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some strengthening is forecast in the next day or so, with some fluctuations in intensity possible on Friday. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km) from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 140 miles (220 km).

The minimum central pressure just extrapolated by an Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft is 942 millibars.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina Sets Port Condition Whiskey

The Coast Guard set Port Condition Whiskey Wednesday for all navigable waters in the North Carolina Captain of the Port Zone in preparation for the anticipated weather impact of Hurricane Joaquin.
Gale-force winds of 39 mph are predicted to reach Frying Pan Shoals Lighted Buoy 16 (LLNR 8355) within 72 hours, and pleasure craft are advised to seek safe harbor. To enter, transit or remain within this Captain of the Port Zone, vessels must comply with the following requirements.
 


1) All self-propelled, oceangoing vessels more than 500 tons, all oceangoing barges and their supporting tugs, and all tank barges more than 200 tons desiring to remain in port must arrange safe mooring and shall complete and submit in writing, within 24 hours to the Captain of the Port, an application to remain in port for approval.

2) All self-propelled oceangoing vessels more than 500 tons, all oceangoing barges and their supporting tugs, and all tank barges more than 200 tons departing the port, must depart no later than 24 hours prior to the arrival of gale-force winds at Frying Pan Shoals Lighted Buoy 16.

3) Vessels bound for these ports that are unable to depart 24 hours prior to the arrival of gale force winds at Frying Pan Shoals Lighted Buoy 16 are advised to seek an alternate destination. 
 


Mariners are also advised drawbridges will remain closed when wind speeds are at or more than 39 mph, or once evacuations begin. Due to uncertainty of weather movements and related bridge closures, mariners are urged to seek passage through drawbridges in advance of the arrival of gale-force winds.

Boaters are also encouraged to remove any electronic position indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs), life jackets and life rings from their boat when the boat is moored and unoccupied. EPIRBs and loose gear often trigger false alerts with the Coast Guard and ties up resources that could be used for real search and rescue cases.

Watch WeatherNation LIVE for Free HERE:
Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 11.49.12 AM

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *