All Weather News

March Extremes: Record Heat in the Central Plains and Snow for the Upper Midwest

15 Mar 2013, 10:27 pm
Signs of Spring…
Thanks to my good friend and old college roommate, Matt Dux, for the picture below out of Kansas City, MO. To be honest, I think he was rubbing it in, but he texted me this picture just to let me know that it was in the 80s there yesterday. He also mentioned that the trees and bushes were well on their way to budding out!
Several high temperature records were broken across the Central Plains today. Here are a few of them.
A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 82 DEGREES WAS SET AT ST. JOSEPH
MO TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 81 SET IN 2003.
RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TOPEKA KS
0655 PM CDT FRI MAR 15 2013

...RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET AT TOPEKA KS...

UPDATE...A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 87 DEGREES WAS SET AT TOPEKA
KS TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 83 SET IN 1914.
A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 81 DEGREES WAS SET AT SPRINGFIELD MO
TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 79 SET IN 1983.

 A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 80 DEGREES WAS SET AT WEST PLAINS MO
TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 79 SET IN 2012.
Tale of Two Seasons

The national temperature map across the country on Friday looked pretty wild. While there was record heat across the central part of the country, it was still quite cool across the far north.
Friday High Temperatures From Normal
This was how much above or below normal high temperatures were expected to be on Friday. As you can see, much of the country was actually warmer than normal.
March Snow Cover 2012 vs 2013

Here’s a satellite shot from above the Great Lakes Region showing the difference between the snow cover this year vs. last on March 14th. Note how much whiter it is this year!
Next Big Snow Maker?
Another big storm looks to be developing across the Upper Mississippi Valley by late weekend early next week. The overall trend on this storm has been a little farther north than previous runs. That would keep the heaviest snow across parts of North Dakota and far northern Minnesota. This is still a developing storm, so things will likely change… Stay tuned!
Stormy Next Week?

There will be at least a couple of storm systems that we’ll have to watch next week. It appears the first system will rear its head in the High Plains/Upper Mississippi Valley by late Sunday. By Tuesday, it’ll be exiting the Great Lakes Region, but not before dumping some decent snow tallies for folks across the far north.
5 Day Snowfall Forecast

The extended forecast (GFS American Model) suggests that there will be decent snowfall potential for some across the far north over the next 5 days.
Another Late Week System

Extended models are also picking up on something by late next week. Mainly for those across the Deep South. However, this is the storm that will help to draw those cooler temperatures in to the Gulf Coast States.
Long Range Precipitation Forecast

NOAA’s HPC 7 day precipitation forecast suggests that these storm system will have the capability of bringing several inches of precipitation to some in the eastern part of the country!
Forecast Still Looks Cool and Somewhat Snowy
The images below are the temperatures a few thousand feet off the ground. This is a fairly good indication of what temperatures are like across the country. Note that even with this recent mild spell for many in the southern half of the country, extended forecasts look a bit chilly by next weekend.
Saturday, March 16th
Saturday temperatures will be cooling for those in the northeast quadrant of the nation, while temperatures in the southwest quadrant of the nation will still be quite warm, perhaps a little ‘hot’ side for some?
Just over a week later: Sunday, March 24th

Look at how different it could be nationwide next weekend. A modified chunk of cool Canadian air looks to invade the eastern half of the country, while the hot weather in the Southwest looks to be squelched a bit.
Spring Really Is Just Around the Corner
This Wednesday, the sun’s most direct rays will pass over the Equator signifying the Vernal Equinox or the first day of Spring for the Northern Hemisphere. Day and night hours across the globe are nearly equal.
On the equinox, night and day are nearly exactly the same length – 12 hours – all over the world. This is the reason it’s called an “equinox”, derived from Latin, meaning “equal night”.

However, even if this is widely accepted, it isn’t entirely true. In reality equinoxes don’t have exactly 12 hours of daylight
The March equinox occurs the moment the sun crosses the celestial equator – the imaginary line in the sky above the Earth’s equator – from south to north. This happens either on March 19, 20 or 21 every year. On any other day of the year, the Earth’s axis tilts a little away from or towards the Sun. But on the two equinoxes, the Earth’s axis tilts neither away from nor towards the Sun, like the illustration shows.”

Read more from TimeAndDate.com HERE:

Warm Thoughts
How about the view in Hawaii!! Thanks to our own Meteorologist Bryan Karrick for this shot.  Must be nice! Hoping he’ll bring some of that nice Hawaiian weather back with him when he returns to Minnesota! Keep the pictures coming Bryan!
Comet Pan-STARRS
And we can’t get enough of the Comet Pan-STARRS pictures. Thanks to my good friend for this amazing shot of Comet Pan-STARRS! Bill has a great eye for pictures! You can see more of his work at mnwxchaser.com HERE:
Thanks for checking in, have a great rest of your weekend!
Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWNTV

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *