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Overnight Update: Winter Storm Slamming Southeast

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The snow came down in record amounts across the Southeast on Wednesday, and as of late Wednesday night, it was just starting to move into the Carolinas, with extensive impacts felt across much of the Southeast.

The heaviest snow was concentrated in a relatively narrow band in northern Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, with southern Arkansas and Tennessee also receiving good snowfall from the storm. The highest snow total, as of late Wednesday night, was in Guin, Alabama, which recorded 12.5″.

Huntsville, Alabama had received 7.9″ of snow through late Wednesday night, making it the third snowiest 24-hour period in the city’s recorded history. Tupelo, Mississippi also recorded its third-snowiest day all-time, officially receiving 6.8″ of snow.

The heavy, wet nature of the snow (due to marginal temperatures and increased water content as a result) led to tens of thousands of power outages across the Southeast, as well. As of 11pm CT, 36,000 customers were without power in Mississippi, 27,500 were in the dark in Alabama, 3,500 outages were reported in North Carolina and over a thousand power outages were reported in Georgia, Arkansas and Florida (Florida’s outages were caused by thunderstorms).

The snow was just starting to move into Charlotte and Raleigh, North Carolina early Thursday morning, with up to a foot of snow possible in those cities. In anticipation of the extensive impacts from the impending snowfall, schools in Raleigh, Charlotte, Atlanta and Norfolk, Virginia are all closed on Thursday. Further north, Washington, D.C. schools are delayed two hours on Thursday.

States of Emergency had been declared in Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee as a result of the storm.

We will continue to track the storm for you with the latest news and information right here on WeatherNationTV.com.

Meteorologist Chris Bianchi

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