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Post-Tropical Cyclone Julia Mixing With Cold Front Along U.S. East Coast

19 Sep 2016, 12:05 pm

The National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on post-tropical cyclone Julia today, Monday, Sept. 19 at 0300 UTC (Sept. 19 at 11 p.m. EDT). At that time there were no coastal warnings or watches in effect. Julia’s remnants were interacting with a cold front and bringing much needed rainfall to parched New England and U.S. Mid-Atlantic states.

Image: NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an infrared image of the clouds associated with the cold front and the remnants on Sept. 19 at 1100 UTC (7 a.m. EDT). the image showed a large swath of clouds from the Carolinas to Maine and into eastern Canada. Credits: NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

NOAA’s GOES-East satellite captured an infrared image of the clouds associated with the cold front and the remnants on Sept. 19 at 1100 UTC (7 a.m. EDT). the image showed a large swath of clouds from the Carolinas to Maine and into eastern Canada.

The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Post-Tropical Julia’s center was located near 32.2 degrees north latitude and 78.4 degrees west longitude. At that time, the center of Julia was about 110 miles (175 km) south-southeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Julia was moving to the northwest at 6 knots and maximum sustained winds were down to 25 knots.

The National Hurricane Center said “The interaction of the remnants of Julia with a weak cold front pushing slowly eastward across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states is expected to produce total rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches across eastern portions of the Mid-Atlantic region northward into eastern New York and southern New England through Tuesday, Sept. 20. Isolated maximum amounts of 8 inches will be possible, especially over portions of eastern North Carolina northward into parts of eastern Virginia, eastern Maryland, Delaware, and southern New Jersey. These amounts could result in localized flooding or flash flooding.”

Rob Gutro – NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

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