All Weather News

Rammasun rams into Manila, but where could it hit next?

With the sun rising early on Wednesday morning in the Philippines, the extent of the damage in the Pacific island nation is becoming increasingly clear. Typhoon Rammasun, with maximum sustanined winds of 95 miles per hour (equivalent to a category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale), moved through metro Manila, the capital of the Philippines and the world’s sixth-most populated city, on Wednesday morning. Rammasun carved a path straight through a heavily-populated corridor of the Philippines, affecting tens of millions and forcing as many as 300,000 evacuations.

Known as “Glenda” in the Philippines, the storm’s eye moved past Manila on Wednesday morning, but the storm’s effects on the low-lying city aren’t over yet. Averaging a sea-level depth of a mere 52.5 feet, Manila is vulnerable to flooding and the storm still needs another six or more hours (as of Tuesday evening Denver time) before it fully pushes through the urban area of over 20 million people. Flooding will likely unfortunately bring major effects into Manila and a good chunk of Luzon, the island on which Manila lies.

7-14_MANILA, PHILIPPINES_GLENDA MAKING LANDFALL_@GMANEWS

A major bridge collapsed over the Calumpang River in Batangas City, about 30 miles south of Manila. At least three people, as of Tuesday evening, had perished, two via lightning strike and a 25-year-old woman died when a power line fell on her.

Unfortunately, Rammasun’s problems won’t simply lie in the Philippines. Next up could be the heavily populated Chinese island of Hainan, home to almost nine million people, potentially as an equivalent category two or three storm. Then, the storm path could take Rammasun (Rammasun, by the way, means “thunder god” in Thai) straight into Hanoi, Vietnam’s second-largest city and home to over seven million.

7-15_CAVITE, PHILIPPINES_@BONDEVEYRA

Fortunately, the tropics here at home in the tropical Atlantic look quiet, at least for now.

We’ll keep you posted with all the latest right here on WeatherNation.

Meteorologist Chris Bianchi

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *