All Weather News

So Long Andrea!

8 Jun 2013, 2:43 pm

The first tropical cyclone of the 2013 season has come and gone, as the National Hurricane Center has issued their last advisory on the storm system as it has moved into the Gulf of Maine.  It will still linger around, but as an extra tropical system that will rain itself out over the Northern Atlantic Ocean. 

Photo: CBS Miami

Florida May Rain Summary

Florida has already seen a lot of rain during the month of May as the state entered it’s rainy season.  But with the passing of Andrea, more rain has been dumped on the Sunshine State.

From NOAA: “The rainy season started out on a wet note as a persistent flow of moisture from the Atlantic spread across south Florida during the month of May, interspersed by a few dry periods associated with a late season cold fronts moving through the area. The greatest rainfall totals were over the eastern half of south Florida where amounts in excess of 10 inches were common (Figure 1 also see table below).  Coastal areas of Palm Beach County received anywhere from 15 to over 20 inches, topped by Juno Beach with 22.05 inches of rain for the month. This led to several locations having a top 10 wettest May on record.”

Florida May Rainfall Totals

Florida 7-Day Rainfall Totals

On top of the heavy rains in Florida, the system also brought about several small tornadoes.  At least a dozen weak tornadoes touched down between June 5-6 in Florida and 3 more in North Carolina on June 6th.  Tropical systems can typically spawn low grade tornadoes (or waterspouts that come ashore) with winds around 65-110 MPH.  Tornadoes form due to the winds at the surface slowing down while the winds aloft maintain a high speed.

The Mid-Atlantic States saw a good soaking of rains from T.S. Andrea as the system traveled up the eastern seaboard.  Here are some of the impressive, record breaking, rain fall totals.

This was an all-too-common sight along the east coast; flooded yards, roads and even homes.
Please do not do what they did in this picture where folks in portions of Long Island, NY decided to drive through flooded roads.  You don’t know how deep those waters are or what lays beneath the surface.  There could be items beneath the water to puncture your tires or your car could fall into a deep spot in the road and the engine get flooded and stall.  We always say, “Turn Around, Don’t Drown” when it comes to flooding situations.  It only takes about 6″ of moving water to float a small car.
As TS Andrea traveled northeastward, she continued to maintain her tropical force wind speeds, but started to transition from a warm-core to a cold-core system and was designated Post-Tropical Storm Andrea.  But that new title didn’t change the fact that she was going to be a big rain maker and portions of the Northeast saw that yesterday as the system barreled down.  Portions of the NY/NJ/CT area saw around 2-6″+ of rain, completely smashing records!  Here is the link to where you can see all the rainfall totals that came out of the NWS New York office.
Rain fall amounts broke records all the way up into New England.  The 4.16″ that fell in Central Park in NYC was more than twice the record of June 7th (1.95″ in 1918).  In Newark, NJ, they saw 3.71″ and that broke the record of 1.11″ in 1931.   Both Islip, NY and Bridgeport, CT saw rainfall totals that nearly tripled the previous records.
Now that Andrea has moved away and out into the Canadian Maritimes, is there something else out there?
There is a of activity in the Gulf of Mexico, but it has a 0% chance of forming within the next 48 hours.  This is what the NHC had to say.

A CLUSTER OF SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS OVER THE CENTRAL GULF OF
MEXICO IS ASSOCIATED WITH A SURFACE TROUGH OF LOW PRESSURE. 
UPPER-LEVEL WINDS ARE NOT CONDUCIVE FOR DEVELOPMENT...AND THIS
SYSTEM HAS A LOW CHANCE...NEAR 0 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL
CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS WHILE MOVING NORTHWARD AT ABOUT 15
MPH.
Over the next several days, there doesn’t seem to be much activity with regards to the tropics.   Typically where tropical storms can form this time of year is in the Gulf of Mexico, the western Caribbean Sea and off in the Atlantic coastal waters off of the Southeast.  The only spot of interests looks to stay in the Caribbean Sea.  Here is the American Model (GFS), from weatherbell.com,  looking out 192 hours from now to the morning of June 16th.
Stay tuned right here at WeatherNation as we continue to go through the rest of the tropical season for all the latest information.  Enjoy the rest of your weekend!
Meteorologist Gretchen Mishek (twitter: @gmishekWNTV) and Meteorologist Addison Green (twitter: @agreenWNTV)

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *