All Weather News

Texas Flooding and Drought Comparison, Dangerous Turbulence near Miami and Manhattanhenge

12 Jul 2012, 12:37 pm

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

What a difference a year makes in Texas. The big story this week is all of the rain causing flash flooding around the Lone Star State.

The photo below shows flooding on the lower deck of I-35, on the northwest side of Downtown San Antonio on 7-11-2012. Picture courtesy of Brandon Rosier. Thanks to the National Weather Service in San Antonio for sharing.

The rain continues to pile up along Coastal Bend in Texas. Three day rainfall estimates of 14 to 16 inches in some spots with a significant area of 6+ inches. Flash flood watches and warnings have been issued…remember “Turn Around Don’t Drown”

See more HERE:

Texas Flood

Well there’s floodin’ down in Texas All of the telephone lines are down”

“Well dark clouds are rollin’ in Man I’m standin’ out in the rain

Listen to Stevie Ray Vaughan’s Texas Flood song HERE:

What a Difference a Year Makes

Last year this time Texas was dealing with a historic drought.  100 percent of the state was abnormally dry and more than two thirds of the state was facing exceptional drought conditions.  Exactly one year later, none of Texas is listed as D4 Exceptional Drought. Other parts of the country are now dealing with serious drought conditions.  You can visit the U.S. Drought Monitor for the latest data.

2011 Drought Monitor Image

Dangerous Turbulence

Strong convection over Cuba and in the Florida Straights contributed to severely turbulent conditions that affected American Airlines Flight 1780 as it approached Miami International Airport on Tuesday, July 10, 2012.  Here’s a satellite image of the storms from NASA.

ABC World News did a great story on the American Airlines Flight. They talked to passengers and took us inside a flight simulator, showing what the conditions were like.  Click Here for more.

Tropical Storm Fabio

 The National Hurricane Center has upgraded Tropical Depression Six-E to Tropical Storm Fabio, located 425 miles south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico.

Get the latest from the NHC at hurricanes.gov

Canadian Wildfires 

Hot temperatures and gusty winds are fueling wildfires in Albert, Canada.  Here’s a snippet from the edmontonjournal.com

“EDMONTON – The province is calling in help to battle several wildfires burning out of control in northwest Alberta.  A state of emergency was declared Wednesday morning in Mackenzie County, where 11 forest fires are burning, one of which was nearing Zama City on Wednesday night. Local officials ordered the evacuation of the hamlet northwest of High Level as the fire, which has burned 100,000 hectares since it was started by a lightning strike on June 21, drew within 10 kilometres to the north. Oil and gas work camps in the area were also evacuated.”

Photo below is courtesy Steve Morin from the edemontjournal.com and shows the wildfire north of High Level near the Hamlet of Zama.

Canadian Fires Bring Smoke and Haze to U.S.

  Thanks to the wind patterns the Northeastern part of the U.S. may see some of the smoke from those fires. The National Weather Service in Caribou, Maine says it might bring a haziness to the area and cause a decrease in the air quality.

Here are a few looks at the fires and smoke from space. Here’s a link to more from NASA.

WeatherNation Fan Photos

We want to feature some of your great weather photos in this blog.

Below is a photo shared by Diane Oneil showing a storm in Knoxville, TN yesterday.  She says her husband, a trained weather spotted took the picture.

Here’s a great sunset photo from Doug Nichols in Scottsburg, Indiana.

Manhattanhenge

And speaking of sunsets are you familiar with Manhattanhenge?

Wednesday evening was the last time that New Yorkers will see a full-sun Manhattanhenge this year, and the weather was perfect.

Here’s more from the Huffington Post: 

“Unlike the year’s first Manhattanhenge back in May, clear skies made for spectacularly clear views of one of the world’s greatest urban phenomena, when the sun aligns itself with Manhattan’s 201-year-old street grid.”

Thanks to @jane_kim on Twitter for sharing her Instagram photo with us.

You can share your photos with us on-line at weathernationtv.com/social or on our Facebook Page  or tweet us @weathernationWX

Thanks for checking in on this Thursday, have a great rest of your week!

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWNTV

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