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Tropical Storm Arlene Forms; Becomes Non-Tropical in 18 Hours

21 Apr 2017, 9:53 am

Tropical Storm Arlene formed Thursday afternoon in the Central Atlantic Ocean, around 800 mile west of the Azores. Satellite estimates indicated maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. The lifespan of Arlene has been short; the storm has already transitioned to an extra-tropical low pressure center (non-tropical) this morning.

The system first formed into a subtropical depression Wednesday morning. Longtime National Hurricane Center Senior Hurricane Specialist Lixion Avila noted in his forecast discussion Thursday afternoon, “I have to add one more surprise to my long hurricane forecasting career. Unexpectedly, the subtropical cyclone became a tropical depression this morning, and then it intensified to a tropical storm.”

Avila also stated, “Tropical storms in April are rare and Arlene is only the second one observed in this month during the satellite era. It should be noted, however, that this type of storm was practically impossible to detect prior to the weather satellite era.”

Before Arlene, there have only been four April tropical systems on record; the most recent Tropical Storm Ana in 2003. The other three were tropical depressions in 1992, 1981 and 1973.

Arlene has become embedded within the circulation of a larger extra-tropical low pressure system and has lost most of the thunderstorms around the center. It is also surrounded by cold air, diminishing tropical characteristics.

For WeatherNation: Meteorologist Mace Michaels

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