All Weather News

Ohio Valley Storms Winding Down Overnight

3 May 2022, 8:40 pm

OHIO – strong to severe thunderstorms rumbled through on Thursday bringing in winds damage and large hail. Through the overnight hours there is an additional risk for severe thunderstorms as the cold front swings through.

Severe Reports

Severe and tornado-warned thunderstorms have moved through the Ohio Valley this Tuesday bringing along with it large hail reports and powerful winds strong enough to take trees down and knock out power for some folks.

Hail reports have been as high as 2.5″ in diameter.

The yellow dots are local storm reports related to hail, and the blue dots are related to wind gust reports.

Outlook

The Storm Prediction Center has highlighted a marginal risk (dark green) for strong storms with the threats of hail, wind and isolated tornadoes for Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

The tornado threat has downgraded to a 2% probability.

As a reminder, severe weather winds are 58+ mph or stronger.

Forecast Timing

Heavy rain along the I-95 corridor will be the primary concern for the overnight hours Tuesday into Wednesday, but most will be loosing their severe storm characteristics.

Most showers and storms will depart the coast by sunrise on Wednesday, with a few pockets of non-severe thunderstorms lingering into northern New England the Chesapeake Bay.

Rain Accumulation

The grounds are saturated in some locations so the Weather Prediction Center has put out an area to monitor for the likelihood of flash flooding or ponding from storms around the I-90 corridor and into western Pennsylvania.

Widespread, most of the region should pick up nearly 2″ of rainfall but a few isolated spots could approach 4″ in total.

Stay with WeatherNation as we bring you the latest on the severe storm chances through the rest of the week.

About the author
Taban Sharifi grew up in Southern California between Los Angeles and San Diego. She is a Certified Broadcast Meteorologist (CBM) with the American Meteorological Society (AMS). She has a B.S. in Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Environmental Sciences with a minor in Environmental Systems and Society from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Go Bruins! While in school, Taban was a meteorology... Load More intern with NBC LA. There she helped forecast daily weather for the greater Los Angeles region and created a playbook to deploy weather sensors for NBC owned-and-operated stations across the country. Her first on-air job took her to San Angelo, Texas, where she was a morning meteorologist and co-anchor. Working in West Texas gave her knowledge and experience covering severe storms. From there, she moved to Palm Springs, California. People think forecasting in California is sunshine all the time, but with temperatures in the 120’s, wildfires, damaging winds, floodings, and earthquakes, the forecasting kept her very busy! She also worked there as a general assignment reporter and told community stories. Taban is excited for the challenge and opportunity to forecast nationally with WeatherNation. She also looks forward to exploring all that Colorado has to offer!